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Super Tuesday thoughts and the Latino vote

February 7th, 2008 · 7 Comments

Well, it looks like Hillary Clinton and Barack Obama have roughly split the delegates on Super Tuesday, which means that both candidates live to fight another round. However, I was struck by how many states Obama won. Sure, Clinton took California, Arizona, New Jersey, Massachusetts, New York, Tennessee, Arkansas, and Oklahoma. But Barack Obama won Missouri, Alaska, Utah, Idaho, Colorado, Minnesota, Connecticut, Kansas, North Dakota, Alabama, Delaware, Illinois, and Georgia. New Mexico’s primary is still too close to call at this point, but it is somewhere within 1000 votes difference between the two candidates.

As expected, Hillary Clinton performed well with the Latino electorate, but I don’t think that we have proven to be the “firewall.” Obama drew many Latino voters in his home state of Illinois and in Connecticut, and he took more than 40 percent of Latino votes in Arizona. He’s especially gaining momentum with younger Latinos, which I tend to see in my own sphere of influence. I think that younger Latinos can more easily relate to Barack Obama than we can Hillary Clinton. He is closer in age to most Latinos, has an immigrant father, and has two young children, aside from great oratory skills that appeal more to younger voters. It seems that Hillary Clinton has tried to make herself appealing to younger Latinos by sending America Ferrara (aka Ugly Betty) and Chelsea Clinton out to various youth events in the Southwest. Yeah, these two rich girls really resonate with us. How many 20-something Latinos do you know work for hedge funds in Manhattan or star in their own sitcoms?

For more specifics on the Latino vote and additional analysis, I like what Roberto Lovato is saying at the Huffington Post. We are on the same wavelength, and I give him credit for astutely pointing out that Latinos are not a monolithic voting block that can be taken for granted. There is a handful of us in Latino blogsphere who have been saying this for a while now, most notably Alisa Valdes-Rodriguez.

On the Republican side, it looks like John McCain is more than halfway to the finish for his party’s nomination. Ironically, John McCain has a more reasonable stance on immigration relative to the other Republican candidates. So much for the anti-immigration issue folks having a lot of traction in this election cycle.

I also think that it is worth noting that Hillary Clinton had to pump $5 million of her own dollars into her campaign last month, and today a report came out that her top staffers have agreed to work without pay for the month of February, including her Latina campaign manager Patti Solis Doyle. You don’t always get the same kind of work product out of non-paid workers as you do from those receiving pay checks. I also find irony in the Latina working this pro bono, but I’m sure that she has lined her pockets nicely over the course of the campaign. She certainly won’t have to file for unemployment benefits like thousands of other Americans are doing right now. I don’t think that this is a good sign for Clinton and company, but it certainly isn’t over.

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Tags: Barack Obama · Democratic Party · Hillary Clinton · Immigration · John McCain · Patti Solis Doyle · Presidential Elections

7 responses so far ↓

  • 1 HispanicPundit // Feb 7, 2008 at 1:20 am

    On the Republican side, it looks like John McCain is more than halfway to the finish for his party’s nomination. Ironically, John McCain has a more reasonable stance on immigration relative to the other Republican candidates. So much for the anti-immigration issue folks having a lot of traction in this election cycle.

    This is more telling than you give it credit, you should have said: “So much for the anti-immigration issue folks in the Republican party having a lot of traction in this election cycle.”

    In other words, as I have said on numerous occasions, the GOP is not anti-immigration, it is only a few loud people that make it seem so. The fact that the most pro-immigration candidate is winning the GOP primary and the most anti-immigration candidate dropped out a while ago testifies to that. Anybody who says otherwise just does not understand the GOP.

  • 2 Regina Rodriguez // Feb 8, 2008 at 5:36 am

    I don’t understand the GOP.

  • 3 When politics gets personal for Latinos » loudpoet // Feb 8, 2008 at 10:29 am

    [...] Latino Politics Blog offers this encouraging analysis: He’s especially gaining momentum with younger Latinos, which I tend to see in my own sphere of influence. I think that younger Latinos can more easily relate to Barack Obama than we can Hillary Clinton. He is closer in age to most Latinos, has an immigrant father, and has two young children, aside from great oratory skills that appeal more to younger voters. It seems that Hillary Clinton has tried to make herself appealing to younger Latinos by sending America Ferrara (aka Ugly Betty) and Chelsea Clinton out to various youth events in the Southwest. Yeah, these two rich girls really resonate with us. How many 20-something Latinos do you know work for hedge funds in Manhattan or star in their own sitcoms? [...]

  • 4 Michaelr // Feb 8, 2008 at 6:13 pm

    Well…the GOP isn’t the party of Abraham Lincoln anymore. They more or less do the bidding for Chevron, Mobil-Exxon, Unocal, Halliburton, Wal-Mart, and the top 1% of the American population.

  • 5 benito camela // Feb 10, 2008 at 4:59 pm

    Michaelr

    Wasn’t Hillary a “director” for Wal-Mart

  • 6 Michaelr // Feb 10, 2008 at 5:26 pm

    That’s correct. Hillary sat on Wal-Mart’s board of directors six years prior to Bill Clinton’s term as President.

    http://www.commondreams.org/views06/0207-34.htm

    That conveys who really tells Hillary what to do. I believe it speaks to the incumbent’s close ties to abusive corporate power: her large corporate financial contributions, her support for so-called “free trade” (which is simply trade to benefit corporations) and her unwillingness to confront corporate power that denies every American, among other things, universal health insurance.

  • 7 Donny Deutsch, Marco Rubio, and the “Coconut Incident” // Feb 24, 2010 at 7:00 pm

    [...] in America opt to view all Spanish surname individuals through a narrow racial lens. As I have said before, Latinos are not a monolithic group. We are multi-racial, mixed, and some may have a more direct [...]

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