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Corona Beer… Our pride?

June 20th, 2008 · 4 Comments

There’s a new slate of ads for Corona Beer targetting Latinos all over the U.S. The tagline is “Nuestro Orgullo. Nuestra Cerveza.”

Alcohol advertisers have notoriously targetted minority populations to push their product. In fact, minority children are bombarded with messages from the alcohol industry at a very young age. When you drive through Latino neighborhoods, you are more likely to see billboards for tequila, beer, or rum in close proximity to homes, schools, and public parks, whereas in more affluent areas, you are less likely to see this kind of advertising anywhere. The National Latino Council on Alcohol and Tabacco Prevention reports that Latinos come in second highest in use of alcohol, binge drinking, and heavy alcohol use.

Given these sobering statistics and realities in our communities, should we support liquor companies that try to equate their products with our pride? And to further expand upon this, wouldn’t it be interesting to see which Latino politicians receive funding from the alcohol industry? One of the sponsors of this year’s National Council of La Raza Conference in San Diego is Miller Brewing Company. Miller probably wants to protect its investment in the Latino community, but does the largest Latino rights advocacy organization need the money that bad?

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Tags: National Council of La Raza · Substance Abuse and Latinos

4 responses so far ↓

  • 1 XP // Jun 21, 2008 at 11:32 am

    “One of the sponsors of this year’s National Council of La Raza Conference in San Diego is Miller Brewing Company. Miller probably wants to protect its investment in the Latino community, but does the largest Latino rights advocacy organization need the money that bad?”

    I dare you to post this in Brownhouse. In fact, I double dog dare you.

    That is just the tip of the iceberg. There are a lot more red flags people should know about the largest Latino rights advocacy organization and their affiliates.

  • 2 Tim Chavez // Jun 23, 2008 at 6:43 pm

    Excellent points. I’m not a big NCLR fan. LULAC is more to my passion and ideals. And what you’re telling me about Miller Brewing Co. and Coors makes me less so.
    Please let me know what more you find out. I’ll join you in calling on NCLR to reject alcohol-product businesses. Every time we have a fatal accident in Nashville, I pray it is not a Latino, particularly an undocumented worker. Those kind of accidents that resulted in the traffic deaths of native Tennesseans were the excuse the local sheriff here used to put us under the heinous 287(g) deportation program. NCLR needs to know about that and the more than 3,000 Latinos who have been deported the past year to the crowing delight of the anti-immigrant crowd.

    Thank you for sharing your awareness,

    Tim Chavez
    http://www.politicalsalsa.com
    Contributing columnist, Hispanic Link News Service, Washington, D.C.

  • 3 Wendy Carrillo // Jun 25, 2008 at 9:09 pm

    hmmm… i dont know… i mean, sure i understand your argument, but corporate responsibility is also important…miller is not going to disappear. i like that at least there is an attempt on their part to spend money on organizations that (allegedly) aim to educate/empower Raza. Who is the culprit here? Miller who in their minds are doing a good thing… or NCLR for not being the progressive org some wish it to be?

  • 4 Anna // Mar 7, 2009 at 2:38 pm

    Miller is just trying to advertise its product and buy off Latino advocacy groups. If they receive money from alcohol companies they won’t speak out against them.

    I read once about a group in Los Angeles that ran workshops in elementary schools teaching children how to decipher alcohol advertising. One advertisment featured picture of a woman dressed in a bathing suit wearing a sash of bullets similar to that worn by Emilio Zapata.

    The ad was trying to make the statement that to drink their liquor was to stand up for yourself, to fight for your rights. Of course that’s false. Alcohol has the opposite effect. It makes them easier to control and more likely to commit crimes and end up in prison.

    I wish I could remember the name of this group.

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